Subway Will Now Measure Its Sandwiches After a 'Footlong' Lawsuit

It’s a question as old as time: How many inches really are in a foot? All it took was a class-action lawsuit against global sandwich peddler Subway. We now know that a foot is, indeed, 12 inches.

|
Oct 22 2015, 5:00pm

Photo via Flickr user James

It's a question as old as time: How many inches really are in a foot?

Is it 11.5 inches? Maybe you'll go with the more abstract, preschool answer of "banana 72." Or you could really stick it to the man and say that you, in fact, don't recognize the metric or imperial system at all. Whatever the case, the answer to this question is clearly a hot button issue, and one that has torn at the fabric of society for way too long.

But no more. And all it took was a class-action lawsuit against global sandwich peddler Subway. We now know that a foot is, indeed, 12 inches.

Two years ago, an Australian teenager named Matt Corby posted a picture of a Subway sandwich with a ruler on top of it on his Facebook page. The shocking photo rocked eaters to their very cores by revealing that Matt's so-called "Footlong" sub was a mere 11 inches. And barely that. The photo ended up going viral and began a call for what would become a class-action lawsuit against Subway, challenging its practice of selling sandwiches shorter than advertised.

As part of a newly reached settlement, the terms of which were agreed to this week, Subway will now be required to actually measure both its "Six-Inch" and "Footlong" subs. Imagine that! Additionally, the chain will introduce new training materials, amending earlier protocols, "which had previously allowed for a small tolerance in the size of a Footlong sandwich."

READ: Some Lady Got Naked and Tore Apart a Subway After Smoking a Ton of Spice

A hearing to be held in January 2016 will finalize the terms of the settlement agreement and plaintiffs could receive up to $1,000 for the losses they suffered thanks to the too-short sandwiches. In addition, the lawyers may walk away with over half-a-million dollars in legal fees.

This settlement is just the latest in a long string of not-very-good news for Subway of late. As we recently reported, a woman strung out on synthetic weed nearly destroyed a Subway outlet in Anchorage after locking herself in the bathroom for several hours and emerging in her birthday suit. And we all know about the embarrassment that Jared Fogle, Subway's long-time spokesperson, has brought upon the chain. To add injury to all the insults, Subway's sales are dropping fast.

Do you think you might be a victim of Subway's too-short subs? Perhaps you can join the class action suit, which defines the class as "all persons in the United States who purchased a Footlong or Six Inch sandwich at a Subway restaurant at any time between the date of January 1, 2003 and the date of preliminary approval."

So is this our payday, friends? Could be. Better get on the bandwagon now. Because Subway will be measuring its subs with a gilded ruler henceforth.