Tokyo’s First ‘Naked’ Restaurant Won't Serve Overweight or Tattooed People

Despite its unabashedly discriminatory entrance policy and not revealing their actual location, The Amrita has already sold out its dinner and dance show tickets.

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Jun 11 2016, 7:00pm

With the runaway success of London's naked pop-up The Bunyadi, which now counts more than 40,000 people on its waitlist, other enterprising restaurateurs have begun taking a shot at offering diners a more liberating experience.

But with the complexity of cultural attitudes toward the human body, it's no surprise that these pop-ups are taking a different form (and shape) from country to country. The Bunyadi, for instance, is inspired by a simpler time in human history, promising no chemicals, no artificial colours, no electricity, no gas, no phone, and, naturally, no clothes.

READ MORE: You Can Get Naked When You Eat at This New London Pop-Up

Melbourne's Noble Experiment, on the other hand, is encouraging diners to strip down in the name of "healthy and positive body image." On the other end of that spectrum would be a restaurant in Japan taking a far more puritanical and discriminating approach to naked eating.

Tokyo's The Amrita eatery will be following the same basic formula as The Bunyadi and the Noble Experiment, but with strict rules about what kind of body will be granted entry into their dining room. According to RocketNews24, The Amrita, which is Sanskrit for "the immortality," won't even really be that naked. Despite being inspired by Adam and Eve, diners will be given "paper underpants" to cover up their bits and pieces after they've removed their clothes.

tokyo-amrita-dance copy

Photo via The Amrita.

Patrons will be served by waiters "with the world's most beautiful bodies" wearing only G-strings and treated to a feast for the eyes in the form of dance performances by "only the best of the best American and European male models."

But wait! It gets weirder. Entry will be denied to those with tattoos, anyone outside the 18- to 60 year-old age bracket, and anyone who is 33 pounds over average body weight. In order to monitor the weight of patrons, they will be subjected to BMI calculations, and if they do not meet The Amrita's strict requirement, hopeful diners will be kicked to the curb with no refunds.

Despite its unabashedly discriminatory entrance policy and not revealing their actual location, The Amrita has already sold out its dinner and dance show tickets, ranging from 12,000 to 80,000 yen ($112 to $563).

The non-naked naked restaurant is slated to run from July 29 to the 31, which will give those who reserved plenty of time to get their BMI to an optimal level.